Making Sure your Vote Counts

You’ve done your research and know where you stand on the issues and the candidates. As you make your game plan, be sure you have all of the details you need. You’ve come too far to get turned away on election day!

For the most part, the laws that determine voting procedure are determined by state. I’ll give example info for the state of Ohio.

Here are four easy-to-make election mistakes, and how to avoid them (spoiler–it’s doing your research):

1. Getting an absentee-by-mail ballot and showing up at your polling place.

In Ohio, if you request an absentee ballot in the mail and then arrive to vote in person, you’ll have to cast a provisional ballot. (and yes, if it’s your only option, you should cast a provisional ballot)

Let’s say you got an absentee ballot but you forgot to buy stamps or for whatever reason you didn’t get your ballot sent in in time. You can still deliver your ballot to your county board of elections on election day.

2. Missing a Valid ID

Requirements vary by state and can change over time. Ohio voter ID requirements can be found here.

If the address on your driver’s license is old, no problem. If your expiration date has passed, however, you need another form of identification. If you have a govt-issued photo ID that is not a driver’s license, the address must be current.

When in doubt–bring a back up form of ID to be sure you are able to cast your ballot.

3. Missing the Poll Closing Time

Even if you think you know when the polls are open, double check! Here is the Voting Schedule for Ohio. In the final days leading up to Ohio elections, the early in-person voting hours get shorter.

And for election day voters, here is a map of poll hours by state.

Ohio polls are open 6:30 am – 7:30 pm. If you’re in line by 7:30 you get to cast your ballot.

4. Heading to your Usual Polling Place sans Research

Double check your polling place at Gettothepolls.com. You might need to head to a different place than last time!

Standard
GOOD NEWS IS COMING sticker

Look for the Helpers: Sources of Hope

I took a Women’s Health in Global Perspective Anthropology class a couple of years ago, and some of the content was brutal. We read books on female genital mutilation, female infanticide as a product of son preference, how the response to the AIDS crisis often ignored women, particularly women of color… Heavy, systemic stuff. To soothe our resulting intrapersonal crises,  our professor integrated a section at the end of each class to cover a grassroots organization that worked to address the issue we were discussing.

As bad as things get, there is always someone to look to for hope and inspiration. Hope that there are people like you who are standing for the same thing you believe in, and inspiration to get off the sidelines and become a mover and shaker yourself.

It’s too easy to find media coverage of the scary people, events and systems that keep you up at night. It takes a little more intention to get enough of the good stuff. We’ve talked about a balanced media diet before, and this is another dimension of finding the right mix.

Fill your tank with inspirational stories–not just the infuriating ones. If you can find local groups to follow (and later engage with!) that’s even better. You might just watch a documentary or scan some articles, and social media gets you access to some pretty impressive people, but connecting with someone you relate with IRL is more powerful.

On that note–what are you putting out into the world? I can admit I’m more likely to use my platforms to vent rather than share the good stuff. The same intention we apply to our content consumption can have a role in what we decide to share, too.

No matter what you are feeling, you are not alone.

 

What kind of helpers and good news resources are you going to look for? Let me know and I’ll point you to any I’m aware of.

 

Feature Photo by Jon Tyson

Standard

Appealing to Your Adversaries

I’m a fan of any tool or community that makes it easier to engage with your rep, but sometimes these resources give lame advice.

A few weeks ago (before multiple women came forward to women have come forward to share their stories of sexual assault at the hands of this nominee) I wanted to call my Senators to ask them to vote against Brett Kavanaugh.

I went to a popular civic action resource and found a script for calling Rob Portman’s office. The script prompted me to demand that Senator Portman defends reproductive freedom. The problem was, Senator Portman is hostile toward women’s right to choose. These talking points weren’t going to cut it.

. . .

You need to advocate for your cause even when it doesn’t align with your rep’s. Yes, your elected official should listen no matter how much they agree with you. But there is an opportunity to make your ask count for more:

1. Know where your rep stands on the general issue.

Is this senator on the record regarding the specific vote or the broader issue? Are you on the same page?

Maybe you don’t agree with their stance. In my case, I was focused on the supreme court nominee’s stance on abortion. Again, we’re in pre-sexual assault allegation land. Stay with me. So abortion rights were a primary concern, but I knew that wasn’t my opportunity to connect with my anti-choice representative.

2. Explore all angles of the topic.

When you call your rep, you want to present as a constituent who might be on their side. When you have something in common, you can come off as someone who they might be able to win over (or retain). Propose about mutual wins instead of digging your heals in on the issues that divide you.

So I wasn’t going to resonate by advocating for reproductive freedoms. I considered other topics of concern regarding the nomination. I knew Portman had vocalized concern with the Commander in Chief. And that Kavanaugh had expressed reluctance toward holding the President accountable for breaking the law. I felt like I was onto something.

I figured presenting first and foremost as a pro-choice advocate would probably have gotten me written off. Don’t get me wrong–I believe there is absolutely a time and place to advocate for fundamental rights that we believe in. But engaging more strategically gives us a better chance of being heard on related-but-separate issues such as this.

3. Bring up your official’s platform promises.

They’ve all got em. Did your rep commit to reducing opioid-related deaths in your state? Bring it up. Say, “I know [Senator] _____ is a champion for _______.” Then make your point for how their vote can make good on the promise they have already made.

Since this Supreme Court nominee demonstrated hostility to a healthcare policy that makes mental health and addiction recovery services more accessible, I tuned into that.

. . .

If you’re going to take a few minutes of your day to appeal to your representative, throw in a moment to consider how to reflect their interests. This takes more work when you’re calling an elected official who sits across the aisle, but it’s a worthwhile investment to make your engagement count.

The same could be said to appeal to a neighbor or family member you don’t always agree with. Connect in ways that resonate with them–or risk broadening the gap. The need for empathy in our communities is increasingly urgent, and everyone has an opportunity to practice.

Standard
people in the voting booth

Beyond the Candidates: Ballot Measures

It’s election day. When you wake up, you see the reminder you set for yourself (nice job!). You stroll in to the polling place all smug, pick the candidates you studied up on and then–the ballot issues.

Shit.

You read the first two lines of the measure and skim the rest after realizing there’s no way you’re going to understand this well enough from the text on the ballot alone (you’re correct).

You leave it empty. Or, go with the party ballot the nice lady in the parking lot handed your overconfident ass on the way in. You make sure you get your sticker but you walk out wondering what you just did. Or so they say, I’m… recalling for a friend.

But ballot measures shouldn’t be forgotten. They cover important issues in your community: drug policy, abortion, taxes, healthcare, rules for future elections, and more.

If you give yourself the time to do a little research, you can earn that sticker for a real one. Go to this list of Ballot Measures by State and get familiar with the issues you’ll see on your ballot in November. Then, check out your county board of elections website for something like this list of certified ballot issues.

Then, find strong sources and learn about their takes. Sometimes the impact of a proposed policy changes is speculative, but there are data you can reference, legislative precedents, and experts who study this stuff for a living. If you aren’t sure where to start, ask a friend you trust for sources to read up, using those media literacy skills we covered in our very first sustainable steps! When ballot issues are complicated we are more vulnerable to misinformation.

It’s worth 15 minutes of your day to get acquainted with these issues–they made it to the ballot because they will impact you and your neighbors.

 

image: Sam Kalda

Standard

Brush Up on Civics 101

I went canvassing recently to survey people about their thoughts on the latest Supreme Court nomination… and no one was familiar.

Sometimes when I ask people close to me about voting they tell me they don’t feel informed enough to participate.

We learn the basics in school, but to be real I was better at pneumonic devices than actually absorbing knowledge from my K12 government lessons, and by the time I got to grad school I needed a refresher. I know I’m not the only one. For one, my professor begrudgingly delivered several such refreshers in her 5000 level health policy class. But besides my anecdotes, there is plenty of evidence that we are slacking in civics know-how:

It’s intimidating to be put on the spot without confidence that you know your stuff–but we shouldn’t let shame or pride get in the way of getting back to basics so we can reinforce the foundation necessary to engage in our communities and in civic life.

Here are some resources to consider for yourself or share with someone else:

Short Videos

Of course, there’s a TED series for that. Specifically TED-Ed’s Government Declassified videos. These shorts cover big events through history, an intro to the United States Federal Reserve, and dozens of other civics lessons. 🏆 Most are animated but there are a few with people talking to a web cam or delivering the classic TED monologue from that infamous red dot carpet.

The TED series has some info-tainment mixed in (e.g. Black Friday: an accident of history). Indiana University’s Center on Representative Government has a collection of ~1 minute videos called Facts of Congress of more educationally focused topics like “Committees” “Key Congressional Leaders” and “House and Senate”. They speak to younger viewers but IMO are not annoying for grown folks to watch.

They do have one on How a Bill Becomes a Law but we all know it could never hold a candle to Schoolhouse Rock’s:

Open Courses

Harvard offers free, self paced courses on U.S. Government on the edX platform. You can take a course or complete the entire series:

  • American Government: Constitutional Foundations
  • U.S. Political Institutions: Congress, Presidency, Courts, and Bureaucracy
  • Citizen Politics in America: Public Opinion, Elections, Interest Groups, and the Media
  • U.S. Public Policy: Social, Economic, and Foreign Policies

You’ll see prices listed for the program or individual courses but that’s completely optional, for if you want the verification for completing the coursework.

 

Knowledge is power, and there’s no shame in getting back to basics. Play a video when you’re doing the dishes or brushing your teeth, or complete an open course over coffee on the weekends. Bonus points if you replace these exercises with a less healthy habit like mindlessly scrolling through Instagram! Get a refresher in Civics 101 and have the confidence you need to go out and engage with your neighbors, your friends and your elected officials.

Standard